How Do You Convince A Loved With Dementia One To Give Up Their Guns?

In addition asking a person to give up driving, families are also faced with how to handle gun ownership when a relative develops dementia. Health Care professionals are urging families to discuss gun ownership and draw up firearms agreements which would act like an advance directive for what to do with the guns as a person’s disease progresses. Also suggested is appropriate language to use – instead of we are taking away your guns use the word “retire” as in you’re going to retire from the use of your guns.” For the complete story, follow our link to NPR.org. to Continue Reading

Alzheimer’s Researchers Challenged Finding Qualified Participants for Clinical Trials

A major challenge medical researchers face is finding qualified participants for clinical trials. Compounding this problem is there are multiple studies competing for clinical trial participants and delays in diagnosis of possible trial participants. For the complete article, follow our link to the New York Times. For Scientists Racing to Cure Alzheimer’s, the Math Is Getting Ugly By Gina Kolata | New York Times The task facing Eli Lilly, the giant pharmaceutical company, sounds simple enough: Find 375 people with early Alzheimer’s disease for a bold new clinical trial aiming to slow or stop memory loss. There are 5.4 million Continue Reading

New Alzhemier’s Drug Shows Reduction of Plaques and Slowing of Dementia

At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, results of a new drug were announced which for the first time in a clinical trial resulted in the reduction of plaques and slowing the progression of dementia. More trials will be necessary to verify if the new drug is truly effective but this drug may be the first to successfully attack both brain changes and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. To read the complete article, follow our link to the New York Times. New Alzheimer’s Drug Slows Memory Loss in Early Trial Results By Pam Belluck | New York Times The long, discouraging quest Continue Reading

Poor Sense Of Smell May Indicate An Increased Risk For Dementia

A recent study concluded that a poor sense of smell may indicate an increased risk for dementia.  Study participants were asked to identify 5 different scents.  The risk for dementia steadily increased with the number of odors they failed to recognize.  People with smelling difficulties had more than twice the likelihood of developing dementia. To read the complete article follow our link. Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Impending Dementia By Nicholas Bakalar | New York Times A poor sense of smell may indicate an increased risk for dementia, a new study has found. Researchers recruited 2,906 men and women Continue Reading