Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

A recent study published in the online issue of Neurology found that physical activity such as walking and light housework like cooking leads to better thinking and memory in adults 70 and older. Study participants took thinking and memory tests every year for 20 years and their brain tissue was examined post-mortem. The study findings suggest that physical activity may be protective even amidst developing Alzheimer’s disease. Physical activity masks symptoms suggesting individuals can have some control over their brain health. For the complete NPR story, follow our link: Read More. Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Continue Reading

How Do You Convince A Loved With Dementia One To Give Up Their Guns?

In addition asking a person to give up driving, families are also faced with how to handle gun ownership when a relative develops dementia. Health Care professionals are urging families to discuss gun ownership and draw up firearms agreements which would act like an advance directive for what to do with the guns as a person’s disease progresses. Also suggested is appropriate language to use – instead of we are taking away your guns use the word “retire” as in you’re going to retire from the use of your guns.” For the complete story, follow our link to NPR.org. to Continue Reading

Manitoba couple forced to live apart after 71 years, care home won’t take them both

With longer lifespans comes longer marriages. What happens when couples who have been married for 50 years or longer need different levels of care in their old age? Follow our link to USA Today to read the complete article. For the complete article, follow our link to CBC News. ‘Life is not the same’: Manitoba couple forced to live apart after 71 years, care home won’t take them both By Erin Brohman | CBC News Two Manitoba couples who have been married for decades are calling on government to help keep them together despite health needs forcing them apart. After Continue Reading

Alzheimer’s Researchers Challenged Finding Qualified Participants for Clinical Trials

A major challenge medical researchers face is finding qualified participants for clinical trials. Compounding this problem is there are multiple studies competing for clinical trial participants and delays in diagnosis of possible trial participants. For the complete article, follow our link to the New York Times. For Scientists Racing to Cure Alzheimer’s, the Math Is Getting Ugly By Gina Kolata | New York Times The task facing Eli Lilly, the giant pharmaceutical company, sounds simple enough: Find 375 people with early Alzheimer’s disease for a bold new clinical trial aiming to slow or stop memory loss. There are 5.4 million Continue Reading

When Can an Adult Child Be Liable for a Parent’s Nursing Home Bill?

Although a nursing home cannot require a child to be personally liable for their parent’s nursing home bill, there are circumstances in which children can end up having to pay. This is a major reason why it is important to read any admission agreements carefully before signing. Federal regulations prevent a nursing home from requiring a third party to be personally liable as a condition of admission. However, children of nursing home residents often sign the nursing home admission agreement as the “responsible party.” This is a confusing term and it isn’t always clear from the contract what it means. Continue Reading

Meals on Wheels in Massachusetts

Meals on Wheels is state and federally funded program that provides a daily visit and nutritious meals for people over age 60 in Massachusetts. The people who deliver these meals provide a human connection to the outside world. Read the Boston Globe article about a Meals on Wheels volunteer on his delivery rounds. For those who receive — and deliver — Meals on Wheels, more than nutrition is on the menu By Robert Weisman | Boston Globe It’s a Tuesday ritual that Vito LaMura holds dear. On that day, the 71-year-old retired teacher drives from his Bedford home to Lexington Continue Reading

In Japan, elderly residents risk dying a “lonely death”

In Japan, elderly residents of the danchi (apartment complexes) risk dying a “lonely death” or dying alone, their body only discovered days after their death. These elderly residents live alone and isolated so much so that an entire industry has developed in specializing in cleaning out apartments where decomposing remains are found. Additionally, many elderly Japanese write “ending notes” that organize their final affairs and ensure a clean orderly death. The danchi (apartment complexes) were built in post war Japan and were a symbol of Japan’s posterity – they introduced Japan to the Western concept of the nuclear family instead Continue Reading

Five tips for choosing a reliable nursing home

Five tips for choosing a reliable nursing home for a family member are: 1 Slow down. 2 Do your homework. 3 Visit all the facilities you are considering ideally at night or the weekend. 4 Ask for the facility’s emergency management plan. 5 Ask for help. For the complete NYT article follow our link. Five Tips for Choosing a Reliable Nursing Home By Katie Thomas | New York Times The news that eight Florida nursing home residents died in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma has prompted a criminal investigation and spurred widespread outrage. But it also poses unsettling, difficult questions Continue Reading

G.O.P. Republicans are weighing options for new health bill

G.O.P. Republicans are weighing options in order to gain support for their proposed health bill including keeping a tax on high income people and providing more money to combat the opioid epidemic and a new incentive for people to establish tax-free savings accounts for medical expenses. Another proposal they are considering would allow insurers to sell cheaper less comprehensive health plans if they also offered health plans that complied with consumer protection standards like those in the Affordable Care Act. If the proposed bill passes, what is sure is that projected Medicaid spending would be reduced 35 percent after 20 Continue Reading

New Protections for Nursing Home Residents

New Obama-era rules designed to give nursing home residents more control of their care are gradually going into effect. The rules give residents more options regarding meals and visitation as well as make changes to discharge and grievance procedures. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid finalized the rules — the first comprehensive update to nursing home regulations since 1991 — in November 2016. The first group of new rules took effect in November; the rest will be phased in over the next two years. Here are some of the new rules now in effect: Visitors. The new rules allow residents Continue Reading