Meals on Wheels in Massachusetts

Meals on Wheels is state and federally funded program that provides a daily visit and nutritious meals for people over age 60 in Massachusetts. The people who deliver these meals provide a human connection to the outside world. Read the Boston Globe article about a Meals on Wheels volunteer on his delivery rounds. For those who receive — and deliver — Meals on Wheels, more than nutrition is on the menu By Robert Weisman | Boston Globe It’s a Tuesday ritual that Vito LaMura holds dear. On that day, the 71-year-old retired teacher drives from his Bedford home to Lexington Continue Reading

In Japan, elderly residents risk dying a “lonely death”

In Japan, elderly residents of the danchi (apartment complexes) risk dying a “lonely death” or dying alone, their body only discovered days after their death. These elderly residents live alone and isolated so much so that an entire industry has developed in specializing in cleaning out apartments where decomposing remains are found. Additionally, many elderly Japanese write “ending notes” that organize their final affairs and ensure a clean orderly death. The danchi (apartment complexes) were built in post war Japan and were a symbol of Japan’s posterity – they introduced Japan to the Western concept of the nuclear family instead Continue Reading

Five tips for choosing a reliable nursing home

Five tips for choosing a reliable nursing home for a family member are: 1 Slow down. 2 Do your homework. 3 Visit all the facilities you are considering ideally at night or the weekend. 4 Ask for the facility’s emergency management plan. 5 Ask for help. For the complete NYT article follow our link. Five Tips for Choosing a Reliable Nursing Home By Katie Thomas | New York Times The news that eight Florida nursing home residents died in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma has prompted a criminal investigation and spurred widespread outrage. But it also poses unsettling, difficult questions Continue Reading

G.O.P. Republicans are weighing options for new health bill

G.O.P. Republicans are weighing options in order to gain support for their proposed health bill including keeping a tax on high income people and providing more money to combat the opioid epidemic and a new incentive for people to establish tax-free savings accounts for medical expenses. Another proposal they are considering would allow insurers to sell cheaper less comprehensive health plans if they also offered health plans that complied with consumer protection standards like those in the Affordable Care Act. If the proposed bill passes, what is sure is that projected Medicaid spending would be reduced 35 percent after 20 Continue Reading

New Protections for Nursing Home Residents

New Obama-era rules designed to give nursing home residents more control of their care are gradually going into effect. The rules give residents more options regarding meals and visitation as well as make changes to discharge and grievance procedures. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid finalized the rules — the first comprehensive update to nursing home regulations since 1991 — in November 2016. The first group of new rules took effect in November; the rest will be phased in over the next two years. Here are some of the new rules now in effect: Visitors. The new rules allow residents Continue Reading

Study Finds That Social Security Workers Often Provide Incomplete Information

Americans are misinformed about many aspects of Social Security, and local Social Security offices may not be helping, according to a study by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). The study found that the Social Security field offices often did not provide key information that would help people make well-informed decisions about when to file for benefits. Deciding on the right time and the right way to apply for benefits can be confusing for many people. While you can apply for Social Security at age 62, your monthly benefit will be much lower than if you waited until your full retirement Continue Reading

Bereavement policies in the workplace

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s husband, Dave Goldberg, died suddenly while they vacationed in Mexico. In her new book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy, San Beth writes of how she coped following her husband’s untimely death. In February, she announced changes to Facebook’s bereavement leave policy so that Facebook employees will have 20 days paid leave to grieve an immediate family member, up to 10 days paid leave to grieve an extended family member and will be able to take 6 weeks to care for a sick relative. Jim Santucci, Executive Director of Kara, a grief counseling Continue Reading

Dispute Between Brothers Demonstrates Need to Plan for Long-Term Care

A recent New Jersey appeals court case demonstrates how important it is for families to come up with a long-term care plan before an emergency strikes. The case involves two brothers who got into a fight over whether to place their mother in a nursing home – a dispute that resulted in one brother filing a restraining order against the other R.G. was the primary caregiver for his parents and their agent under powers of attorney. After R.G.’s mother fell ill, R.G. wanted to place his mother in a nursing home. R.G.’s brother objected to this plan, but R.G. went Continue Reading

Outpatient rehabilitation suffer fewer post operative complications

Over one million knee and hip operations are performed annually in the United States contributing to rising health care costs. One study concluded that patients discharged to their home with outpatient rehabilitation suffered fewer post operative complications than patients transferred to a rehab facility postoperatively. An Australian study concluded that patients who performed a home exercise program recover just as well as those in rehab facilities. After Knee or Hip Replacement, No Place Like Home By JANE E. BRODY | Read Entire Article Growing numbers of Americans are outliving their joints. More than a million operations are done annually to Continue Reading

Aging Drivers and the Law

For better or for worse, our current culture is very car-dependant; in many places, cars are the only convenient link to the outside world. Unfortunately, as people age, driving can become more difficult and more dangerous. The elderly drive less, but have more crashes per mile than younger drivers. This is partially because elderly individuals are more likely to be affected by poor eyesight, chronic disease, and medications that might impair driving. States vary widely on how they treat older drivers.  (For information each state’s license renewal procedures, click here.) While no state will revoke a driver’s license based only Continue Reading